Let’s go exploring :)

Happy New Year folks! Glad you are back. So where do we go this year?

With too many friends and acquaintances flouting their new year resolutions, I was under too much peer pressure to come up with a couple of em. But I miserably procrastinated, and lo 2010 is 1 week old and I don’t have any resolutions. Then I came across this article. Haven’t made much of it, but you might find it interesting.

Calvin n Hobbes creator Bill Watterson’s commencement address at Keynon College (it’s 20 years old, so chances are that you may have come across this)

You’ll be told in a hundred ways, some subtle and some not, to keep climbing, and never be satisfied with where you are, who you are, and what you’re doing. There are a million ways to sell yourself out, and I guarantee you’ll hear about them. To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.

You will find your own ethical dilemmas in all parts of your lives, both personal and professional. We all have different desires and needs, but if we don’t discover what we want from ourselves and what we stand for, we will live passively and unfulfilled. Sooner or later, we are all asked to compromise ourselves and the things we care about. We define ourselves by our actions. With each decision, we tell ourselves and the world who we are. Think about what you want out of this life, and recognize that there are many kinds of success.
Many of you will be going on to law school, business school, medical school, or other graduate work, and you can expect the kind of starting salary that, with luck, will allow you to pay off your own tuition debts within your own lifetime.But having an enviable career is one thing, and being a happy person is another.
Creating a life that reflects your values and satisfies your soul is a rare achievement. In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not a subversive. Ambition is only understood if it’s to rise to the top of some imaginary ladder of success. Someone who takes an undemanding job because it affords him the time to pursue other interests and activities is considered a flake. A person who abandons a career in order to stay home and raise children is considered not to be living up to his potential-as if a job title and salary are the sole measure of human worth.
You’ll be told in a hundred ways, some subtle and some not, to keep climbing, and never be satisfied with where you are, who you are, and what you’re doing. There are a million ways to sell yourself out, and I guarantee you’ll hear about them. To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.
You will find your own ethical dilemmas in all parts of your lives, both personal and professional. We all have different desires and needs, but if we don’t discover what we want from ourselves and what we stand for, we will live passively and unfulfilled. Sooner or later, we are all asked to compromise ourselves and the things we care about. We define ourselves by our actions. With each decision, we tell ourselves and the world who we are. Think about what you want out of this life, and recognize that there are many kinds of success.
Many of you will be going on to law school, business school, medical school, or other graduate work, and you can expect the kind of starting salary that, with luck, will allow you to pay off your own tuition debts within your own lifetime.But having an enviable career is one thing, and being a happy person is another.
Creating a life that reflects your values and satisfies your soul is a rare achievement. In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not a subversive. Ambition is only understood if it’s to rise to the top of some imaginary ladder of success. Someone who takes an undemanding job because it affords him the time to pursue other interests and activities is considered a flake. A person who abandons a career in order to stay home and raise children is considered not to be living up to his potential-as if a job title and salary are the sole measure of human worth.
You’ll be told in a hundred ways, some subtle and some not, to keep climbing, and never be satisfied with where you are, who you are, and what you’re doing. There are a million ways to sell yourself out, and I guarantee you’ll hear about them. To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.
Full article here.
My point is they categorize this speech and Gordon Gekko’s speech as inspirational. Maybe they are, but it is confusing.
calv
Let all of us get comfortable with ambiguity this year 🙂 Have a good one!

4 Responses to Let’s go exploring :)

  1. bombaydosti January 8, 2010 at 9:23 am #

    i thought, you were used to it, by now 🙂
    good one… wish you too a good year 🙂

  2. GKW January 9, 2010 at 1:09 am #

    Thank you! I think that was one of the best posts I read to kickoff the New Year.
    That duality and ambiguity is probaby good, right? It’s tough practically to walk that line…but then if & when we do / I guess we keep life in balance.

    G

  3. rajiv January 10, 2010 at 10:03 am #

    Good one! Happy New Year!

  4. bvn January 11, 2010 at 8:04 pm #

    BD, today I was taught comfort and structure is one. Ambiguity is another. Comfort in ambiguity is like enjoying white noise 🙂

    Warrier, NYTimes calls 2010 The Great Ambiguity 🙂

    Rajiv, HNY 🙂

Leave a Reply