One of the saddest images I’ve seen. Full slide-show on NYTimes.

BP Turtle

And in tonight’s report Colbert said “BP is a foreign company operating in our country. Which shed our blood, and destroyed our land and livelihood”. Then he discussed punishing British Petroleum. In other news US Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia Robert Blake said no further action will be taken against Union Carbide for the worst industrial disaster in the world which killed 20,000 people on the night of December 2nd 1984. Always have this in mind when we speak of foreign direct investment as the only road to paradise.

Update: Today’s Time magazine has an article on the same lines ,

Although environmental legislation was ramped up in the wake of the Bhopal disaster, companies continue to operate in India in ways that severely — if not as dramatically — pollute the environment and impact people’s health and livelihoods. Britain-based mining major Vedanta, for instance, has faced censure from Amnesty International for violating the human rights of communities in Orissa, where it operates bauxite mines. India continues to be the world’s e-waste dump. Of late, the government, keen to attract foreign investment to its nascent nuclear energy market, has been pushing a bill to limit the liability of a nuclear-plant operator to $111 million. “We’ve learned nothing from Bhopal,” says Supreme Court lawyer Prashant Bhushan. “There is a drive to attract foreign investment overwhelming all other considerations.” Opposition parties have already demanded a rethink of the proposed legislation in the face of the Bhopal outcome.
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1995029,00.html#ixzz0qOJKBire

Although environmental legislation was ramped up in the wake of the Bhopal disaster, companies continue to operate in India in ways that severely — if not as dramatically — pollute the environment and impact people’s health and livelihoods. Britain-based mining major Vedanta, for instance, has faced censure from Amnesty International for violating the human rights of communities in Orissa, where it operates bauxite mines. India continues to be the world’s e-waste dump. Of late, the government, keen to attract foreign investment to its nascent nuclear energy market, has been pushing a bill to limit the liability of a nuclear-plant operator to $111 million. “We’ve learned nothing from Bhopal,” says Supreme Court lawyer Prashant Bhushan. “There is a drive to attract foreign investment overwhelming all other considerations.” Opposition parties have already demanded a rethink of the proposed legislation in the face of the Bhopal outcome.